Art and Sustainability

"Why should we think upon things that are lovely? Because thinking determines life. It is a common habit to blame life upon the environment. Environment modifies life but does not govern life. The soul is stronger than its surroundings." –William James (1842-1910), American philosopher and psychologist

Photos from Berkeley Parks’ show at Sightline March 12, 2010

Filed under: Berkeley Parks,collage,shows — Becky @ 5:20 pm
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Berkeley Parks’ art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle with Mieko at her desk

 

Berkeley Parks’ art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle

 

One of 35 collages by Berkeley Parks on view at Sightline Institute through April, 2010. Each 11″ x 11″ collage on white paper was created from fragmented posters peeled off telephone poles located on Capitol Hill in Seattle.

 

Berkeley Parks’ art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle

 

One of 35 collages by Berkeley Parks on view at Sightline Institute through April, 2010. Each 11″ x 11″ collage on white paper was created from fragmented posters peeled off telephone poles located on Capitol Hill in Seattle.

 

Berkeley Parks’ art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle

 

The view of Berkeley Parks’ “Uncharted Space” series from the hallway

 

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“Uncharted Space” by Berkeley Parks March 3, 2010

Filed under: Berkeley Parks,collage,shows — Becky @ 3:22 pm
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We are pleased to announce “Uncharted Space,” the sixth show in our series at Sightline Institute in downtown Seattle. Seattle artist Berkeley Parks has 35 collage works on display through the end of April. Each 11″ x 11″ collage on white paper intrigues the viewer as an individual work of art as well as part of the collection. She says:

This body of work continues my monologue on “found object” as art. For my “paint,” I used fragmented posters peeled off telephone poles located on Capitol Hill. The collages are as much about the abstraction on the page as the POSITIVE aspects of the negative space: the last frontier, outer space, that quiet space within and the stimuli without. They could be exploring composition and texture; they could be contemporary illuminated manuscript pages. More importantly, they are what YOU want them to be – art as an evolving conversation.

I have always seen myself as a conceptual sculptor. My previous 3-d work has been narrative both in content and in relationship to companion pieces hung adjacent. This new 2-d series is only mildly inter-related. For me it still feels true and naturally tangential with the sculptural due to the rough, torn edges. I thoroughly enjoy having my hand (literally) in the art which lends itself to experimenting in many media. Process for me is exciting. Sometimes I am driven to making my own found object as a way to find my way with some different process.

To view Berkeley’s art at Sightline, visit the office between 10am and 3pm on weekdays through the end of April. Prices available from the curator, Becky Brooks, upon request. Email her at becky (at) tomecat (dot) com.

Sightline Institute
1402 Third Ave,
Fifth Floor, Suite 500
Seattle, WA
206-447-1880 ext. 100

What thoughts about sustainability are inspired by Berkeley’s art (and by art in general)? Share yours in a comment.

 

Photos from Sue Danielson’s show at Sightline November 4, 2009

Filed under: acrylic,collage,mixed media,shows,Sue Danielson — Becky @ 8:11 pm
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Sue Danielson's "Dislocation" Series

Sue Danielson’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle with Mieko at her desk

 

Sue Danielson's "Dislocation" Series

Sue Danielson’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office

 

Sue Danielson's "Dislocation" Series

Sue Danielson’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office

 

Sue Danielson's "Dislocation" Series

Mixed media pieces “Elemental” and “Radiance” by Sue Danielson

 

Sue Danielson's "Dislocation" Series

The view of Sue Danielson’s “Dislocation” series from the hallway

 

Sue Danielson

Sue Danielson in her studio

 

 

“Dislocation” by Sue Danielson September 4, 2009

Filed under: acrylic,collage,mixed media,shows,Sue Danielson — Becky @ 2:39 pm
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"Dreaming Home in Pink" by Sue Danielson

"Dreaming Home in Pink" by Sue Danielson

We are pleased to announce the third show in our series at Sightline Institute in downtown Seattle. Seattle artist Sue Danielson has her
“Dislocation” series on display through the end of October.

On view are 15 acrylic paintings, some with collage elements and ink as well. In mostly muted tones with splashes of brighter color, Sue’s paintings depict “the disparity between reality and dreams of home.” Prompted by recent events in her life and in the world around her, Sue has explored and investigated this gap. She says,

It seemed that the meaning of home was shifting around me. I began to wonder how much our longing for home is purely emotional once we move beyond the need for physical shelter. It occurred to me that home is a symbol of our imaginings. I am interested in what happens when reality and dreams of home do not quite line up. The desire to put this into two-dimensional space is what compels me to paint.

Sue Danielson has studied under Paul McCall, Julia Hensley, and Michael Howard and is inspired by the landscape and environment of the Pacific Northwest where she has lived most of her life. A proud Sightline donor for several years, Sue currently lives in Seattle and paints in her studio at Ballard’s Building C. You can catch her in her studio on the Second Saturday of the month during Ballard’s Art Walk.

To view her art at Sightline during September and October, visit the office between 10am and 3pm on weekdays. All 15 pieces are available for purchase.

Sightline Institute
1402 Third Ave,
Fifth Floor, Suite 500
Seattle, WA
206-447-1880 ext. 100

What thoughts about sustainability are inspired by Sue’s art (and by art in general)? Share yours in a comment.

 

Photos from Bryan’s show at Sightline September 3, 2009

bryan and sculptures

Bryan Smith installing his artwork at Sightline Institute.

 

SculpturesOnBookcase

Three individual cardboard sculptures (“Hoppy” (large) and “You” (two smaller pieces)) installed above the bookcase.

 

MissionRipe by BryanSmith

“Mission Ripe,” found cardboard boxes on hexboard, by Bryan Smith. 46″x36″x2″

 

bryan and becky

Becky Brooks, curator, and Bryan Smith, artist, after installing Bryan’s show at Sightline.

 

Bryan Smith WallDisplay3

Bryan Smith’s artwork hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle.

 

Bryan Smith WallDisplay2

Bryan Smith’s artwork hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle.

 

BryanSmithViewfromHallway

The view of the two-paneled “Pop” from the hallway.

 

 

“Re-” by Bryan Smith July 10, 2009

Come see what’s growing out of the walls at Sightline…

Cardboard sculpture by Bryan Smith

Detail of "Hoppy" by Bryan Smith

In our second show at Sightline Institute, the work of Seattle artist Bryan Smith is now on display through August 27.

Visit the office between 10am and 3pm on weekdays.

Sightline Institute
1402 Third Ave,
Fifth Floor, Suite 500
Seattle, WA
206-447-1880 ext. 100

On view is an unimaginable collection of inlaid and/or sewn cardboard works, both 2-D and 3-D. Bryan says,

I utilize the colors, texture, and text of discarded cardboard to create a body of work reflective of painterly forms. Through the co-option of printed symbols and text found on the cardboard boxes, I fabricate compositions that offer a level of cultural familiarity, while simultaneously placing the viewer in a unique and engaging landscape.

Bryan Smith is a graduate of Cornish College of the Arts, 2000. He has been in numerous solo and group shows both locally and nationally. His work is in the collections of Microsoft Toronto, Canada; King County; City of Seattle; as well as private collections. He has taught assemblage at Pratt Fine Arts Center and enjoys experimenting with different art forms, including making frame drums and stop motion films. Currently, Bryan lives and works in Seattle.

All works are available for purchase. Contact Bryan directly at bryansmithvis (at) msn (dot) com with sales inquiries.

What thoughts about sustainability are inspired by Bryan’s art (and by art in general)? Share yours in a comment.

 

Photos from Julia’s show at Sightline July 9, 2009

Julia pondering

Julia Hensley pondering the placement of her artwork in the Sightline lobby.

 

West From Gasworks by Julia Hensley

“West from Gasworks” Gouache-on-paper collage by Julia Hensley.

 

Show

Julia Hensley’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle.

 

Show

Julia Hensley’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle.