Art and Sustainability

"Why should we think upon things that are lovely? Because thinking determines life. It is a common habit to blame life upon the environment. Environment modifies life but does not govern life. The soul is stronger than its surroundings." –William James (1842-1910), American philosopher and psychologist

Photos from Chris Cantu’s show at Sightline September 5, 2011

Filed under: acrylic,Chris Cantu,shows — Becky @ 6:47 pm
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Chris Cantu’s “Pastorale’s Edge” series of acrylic paintings hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle

 

“Pastoral” 22″ x 24″ acrylic on canvas by Chris Cantu

 

“Cow-templation” 12″ x 9″ acrylic on canvas by Chris Cantu

 

Chris Cantu’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle

 

Chris Cantu’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle

 

The view of Chris Cantu’s “Pastorale’s Edge” show from the hallway

 

See more of Chris’s artwork here.

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“Pastorale’s Edge” by Chris Cantu July 26, 2011

Filed under: acrylic,Chris Cantu,shows — Becky @ 5:10 pm
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"Blue Colt" acrylic on canvas, 18”x24” by Chris Cantu

For the thirteenth show in our “Art & Sustainability” series at Sightline Institute, we are pleased to present “Pastorale’s Edge” by Edmonds artist Chris Cantu. Fourteen acrylic paintings featuring pastoral scenes in illuminating combinations of both fantastical and realistic colors are now on view through the beginning of September.

Paintings by Chris put a smile on your face. Without romanticizing them, she expresses both joy and respect for animals in the countryside by confidently using bold colors and textures. Her quirky humor sheds a unique light on her subjects, whether it be a contemplative cow or a fish cooking on a grill. She says:

More than line, form, or composition, it has always been color that provided me a pathway to artistic expression. I seek to heighten and “liberate color from realism,” in the words of one of my art heroes, Henri Matisse. Color is life and thus carries great emotional weight for all of us, and so I have used it here to communicate my response to the natural world and especially animals. I invite you into a world where color speaks volumes, no matter if the subject matter is a smart-aleck rabbit, a meditative cow, or a landscape.

Originally from Kansas City, Missouri, Chris has called the Pacific Northwest home for over twenty five years. She received a BA in Art from the University of Washington and has continued her artistic journey through more coursework at the UW, as well as at Pratt Fine Arts Center and Gage Academy of Art. She credits teaching artists Julia Hensley, Rickie Wolfe, and Will Bonner for helping her along her current path. A frequent participating artist in both the Edmonds Art Studio Tour and the Edmonds Arts Festival, Chris has also been featured in a number of juried shows in the Puget Sound Region and in Missouri. Her artwork can be found at Fraker/Scott Gallery in Pioneer Square of downtown Seattle.

To view Chris’s art at Sightline, visit the office between 10am and 3pm on weekdays through the beginning of September. All works are available for purchase; some may also be purchased as prints. Contact Chris directly at 2cantu (at) comcast (dot) net.

Sightline Institute
1402 Third Ave,
Fifth Floor, Suite 500
Seattle, WA
206-447-1880 ext. 100

What thoughts about sustainability are inspired by Chris’s art (and by art in general)? Share yours in a comment.

 

Photos from Susan Melrath’s show at Sightline June 27, 2011

Filed under: acrylic,shows,Susan Melrath — Becky @ 7:12 pm
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The view of Susan Melrath’s “Bloom” show from the hallway

 

“Midnight Angels” diptych – 48”x60” each, acrylic on canvas by Susan Melrath

 

“Dream Garden” 80”x24” acrylic on board by Susan Melrath (see full view here)

 

Susan Melrath’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle

 


Artist Susan Melrath

 

See more of Susan’s artwork here.

 

“Bloom” by Susan Melrath May 12, 2011

Filed under: acrylic,shows,Susan Melrath — Becky @ 10:32 pm
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To continue with our cravings for spring this year, we present Redmond artist Susan Melrath‘s “Bloom,” the twelfth show in our series at Sightline Institute in downtown Seattle. “Bloom” features one large diptych and six other acrylic paintings, each breathtaking in their boldness of color and pattern. The show will be up through the end of June. Susan says about her work:

Rich colors, patterns, and flat, poetic shapes….each component is a metaphor for the passage of time and the complex relationships in our lives. Built around the architecture of flora, my paintings are a celebration of life, growth, and the rhythm of the seasons. I find patterns everywhere from textiles and mosaics, to natureʼs cellular shapes. Each painting grows through a process of layering colors and repeating forms. Playing with unique color combinations, and discovering new relationships among the layers is the adventure I enjoy with each piece.

What makes Susan’s “Bloom” series unique is her combination of technology and traditional painting technique. “Red Seed” was the first piece inspired by her use of Brushes, a painting application on her iPhone. This app allowed her to play quickly and freely with colors and layers. These paintings are the final expressions of this series of iPhone studies.

Susan has further integrated technology into this exhibit by posting a mobile tag (QR Code) with each painting to provide in-depth information about each piece. Be sure to download a QR Code Reader App and bring your smartphone for this comprehensive experience. If you don’t have a smartphone, you can watch two videos explaining her process here: “Midnight Angels” and “Dream Garden.” Just for fun, watch Susan create a painting in 13 seconds. Read more about her art and process on her blog.

To view Susan’s art at Sightline, visit the office between 10am and 3pm on weekdays through the end of June. All works are available for purchase. Contact Susan directly at susan (at) susanmelrath (dot) com.

Sightline Institute
1402 Third Ave,
Fifth Floor, Suite 500
Seattle, WA
206-447-1880 ext. 100

What thoughts about sustainability are inspired by Susan’s art (and by art in general)? Share yours in a comment.

"Dream Garden" acrylic on board, 80”x24” by Susan Melrath

 

Photos from Terry Sargent Peart’s show at Sightline November 2, 2010

Filed under: acrylic,shows,Terry Sargent Peart — Becky @ 6:03 pm
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Terry Sargent Peart’s artwork in the show “State of the Urban Landscape” at Sightline Institute

 

Terry Sargent Peart’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle

 

Terry Sargent Peart’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle

 

“Spokane #3” acrylic on canvas 10″ x 8″ by Terry Sargent Peart

 

“Spokane #2” acrylic on canvas 10″ x 8″ by Terry Sargent Peart

 

Terry Sargent Peart’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle

 

“State of the Urban Landscape” by Terry Sargent Peart September 17, 2010

Filed under: acrylic,shows,Terry Sargent Peart — Becky @ 3:23 pm
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"17th & Roxbury" acrylic on canvas 30" x 20" by Terry Sargent Peart

Now on display in Sightline Institute‘s downtown office until the end of October is the exhibit “State of the Urban Landscape,” a series of 17 acrylic paintings by Terry Sargent Peart. From vacant buildings to freeway buttresses, many of Terry’s subjects are views we may wish to ignore or deny. With her strength in line, color, and depth of field, she forces us to look, and ultimately see beauty in these structures.

Now a dispatcher for King County, Terry was a full-time truck driver for 25 years, and many of her paintings are evidence of being inspired by the view from the cab of her truck. She says that she “enjoys the play of light and shadow on the ever-present cement structures found in urban settings.”

Terry constantly carries a sketchbook and camera with her, never knowing when inspiration will strike, whether it’s catching moments in coffee shops through gesture drawings, creating sophisticated figure drawings, or doodling that becomes future experiments in paint, fabric, and/or printing.

Yes, not only does Terry paint and draw, but she makes prints on her own full-size printing press, dyes her own fabric, and makes quilts! Recently she has started to combine her media interests into unique mixed-media pieces. Follow these pursuits on her blog. A recent post describes the process of dyeing fabric with blackberries.

Terry currently lives in West Seattle with her husband, furnituremaker Darrell Peart, and their Jack Russell terrier. Though she often explores urbanity in her artwork, Terry, like most native Washingtonians, savors the natural wonders of the area. Walking her dog and bicycling give her many opportunities to do so.

To view her art at Sightline, visit the office between 10am and 3pm on weekdays through the end of October. All but one of the works are available for purchase. Contact Terry directly at peart (at) comcast (dot) net with sales inquiries.

Sightline Institute
1402 Third Ave,
Fifth Floor, Suite 500
Seattle, WA
206-447-1880 ext. 100

What thoughts about sustainability are inspired by Terry’s art (and by art in general)? Share yours in a comment.

Self-portrait of Terry, acrylic on canvas

 

Photos from Sue Danielson’s show at Sightline November 4, 2009

Filed under: acrylic,collage,mixed media,shows,Sue Danielson — Becky @ 8:11 pm
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Sue Danielson's "Dislocation" Series

Sue Danielson’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office in downtown Seattle with Mieko at her desk

 

Sue Danielson's "Dislocation" Series

Sue Danielson’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office

 

Sue Danielson's "Dislocation" Series

Sue Danielson’s art hanging in the lobby of the Sightline Institute office

 

Sue Danielson's "Dislocation" Series

Mixed media pieces “Elemental” and “Radiance” by Sue Danielson

 

Sue Danielson's "Dislocation" Series

The view of Sue Danielson’s “Dislocation” series from the hallway

 

Sue Danielson

Sue Danielson in her studio